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Posts tagged Robert Zemeckis

In 1982 Tangelos' synthesized music, narrator and ill-fitting ending attempt to tell the audience to feel happy as a seminal film classic comes to its original ending. Blade Runner Ridley Scott, 1982 Cinematography | Jordan Cronenweth

In 1982 Tangelos’ synthesized music, narrator and ill-fitting ending attempt to tell the audience to feel happy as a seminal film classic comes to its original ending.
Blade Runner
Ridley Scott, 1982
Cinematography | Jordan Cronenweth

A person has just lost their life partner and sits in a crowded room. A concerned friend approaches and sits next to the grieving individual. The friend awkward touches the friend on the arm.

I’m so sorry. I know just how you feel.

The friend should have stopped at “sorry.”

The absolute worst comment that can be made to a person who has just suffered a life-changing loss is “I know how you feel.” We might think we know, but the truth is we only have an empathetic idea of what another feels at such a time. It may sound trite, but human beings are like snowflakes. We are each slightly different in comparison to each other. A person has clue regarding the feelings of another human being who has just suffered a tragic loss.

The Narrator is unreliable, but Bob offers comfort. Edward Norton & Meat Loaf Fight Club David Fincher, 1999 Cinematography | Jeff Cronenweth

The Narrator is unreliable, but Bob offers comfort.
Edward Norton & Meat Loaf
Fight Club
David Fincher, 1999
Cinematography | Jeff Cronenweth

A driver sits in her/his car at a red light. The light turns green. The driver is in a hurry, he/she applies a bit more pressure to the gas peddle than normal. Her/his car slams into the back bumper of another car traveling the intersection. The driver of the car crossing the interaction is furious. Both of these drivers will normally have opposing views of this fender-bender. In fact it is quite probable that the other drivers and pedestrians who witness the accident will have differing views regarding who is at fault.

An aging parent espouses

Perception is a tricky thing when evaluated between two or more other people. Hardly any one wants to be told how to feel. Very few like to be told what to do. But absolutely no one wants to be made to feel like an idiot.

"I feel the words building inside me, I can't stop them, or tell you why I say them, but as I reach the top of the bridge these words come to me in a whisper. I say these words as a prayer, as regret, as praise, I say: 'Lowenstein, Lowenstein.'" Despite the dewy-glow of a silly subplot, the movie actually works save for a painful narration. Nick Nolte, Barbra Streisand and nails The Prince of Tides Barbra Streisand, 1991 Cinematography | Stephen Goldblatt

“I feel the words building inside me, I can’t stop them, or tell you why I say them, but as I reach the top of the bridge these words come to me in a whisper. I say these words as a prayer, as regret, as praise, I say: ‘Lowenstein, Lowenstein.'”
Despite the dewy-glow of a silly subplot, the movie actually works save for a painful narration.
Nick Nolte, Barbra Streisand and nails
The Prince of Tides
Barbra Streisand, 1991
Cinematography | Stephen Goldblatt

I began with reality examples to point out that the use of voice-over narration is most often a major mistake. Not all the time, but most of the time when I see a film utilizing voice-over narration my eyes want to roll up into my head. This is a knee-jerk response that I hold at bay to give any such film in question a chance to prove the use a wise one. Most of the time when a film features a narration it comes across as lazy filmmaking. The other problem is that this style of cinematic story telling has been over used for decades. It often feels less “old-school” and more simply “old” and completely outmoded.

But there are filmmakers who can use voice-over narration to benefit their films. A solid example of a good narration use — maybe even one of the best — is Woody Allen’s Annie Hall and Manhattan. In Annie Hall Allen not only provides narration — he breaks the fourth wall. And it works! He is far from being the only film artist to successfully break that wall between the film and the audience. When Mary Harron and Guinevere Turner adapted Bret Easton Ellis notorious novel, American Psycho, for the big screen they took a major gamble for a lower budgeted independent film: They had Christian Bale’s Patrick Bateman constantly breaking the fourth wall and act as not only a narrative device but an unreliable and darkly funny one.

"I gain no deeper knowledge of myself. No new knowledge can be extracted from my telling. This confession has meant nothing." Christian Bale not only serves as a narrative device which breaks the fourth wall, he brings unreliable narration to a whole new level. Christian Bale American Psycho Mary Harron, 2000 Cinematography | Andrzej Sekula

“I gain no deeper knowledge of myself. No new knowledge can be extracted from my telling. This confession has meant nothing.”
Christian Bale not only serves as a narrative device which breaks the fourth wall, he brings unreliable narration to a whole new level.
Christian Bale
American Psycho
Mary Harron, 2000
Cinematography | Andrzej Sekula

Wes Anderson’s The Royal Tenenbaums smartly employees Alex Baldwin to provide a voice-over narration that not only serves the film — it totally enhances the film itself. But perhaps the three best examples of voice-over narration that not only works but makes their films even better are Sunset Blvd., Taxi Driver and A Clockwork Orange. Billy Wilder was way ahead of his time when he had a dead character narrate the sad, twisted, tragic and darkly comical tale of Norma Desmond in a sure-footed feat of detailed flashback. Wilder does not rob his film of suspense by revealing that William Holden’s Joe Gillis has been killed. The use of this device adds multiple perspectives to a surprisingly blunt slap at the film industry and the notion of aging celebrity.

"The poor dope. He always wanted a pool." Unique twist of narration assists a movie that a cinematic game-changer. William Holden is your dead narrator. Sunset Blvd. Billy Wilder, 1950 Cinematography | John F. Seitz

“The poor dope. He always wanted a pool.”
Unique twist of narration assists a movie that a cinematic game-changer.
William Holden is your dead narrator.
Sunset Blvd.
Billy Wilder, 1950
Cinematography | John F. Seitz

Martin Scorsese is a filmmaker who has always understood how to employee voice-over narration to work in his film’s favor. Robert De Niro’s Travis Bickle‘s narration not only truly drives Taxi Driver forward, it offers the viewer insights into the horrifying motivations of the title character. The film rattled cages 40 years ago and continues to do so today because we are allowed to see inside the mind of a psychopath who is humanized in our minds. His anguish and anger accelerates to a crescendo of violence that luckily resolves a horrific problem. Scorsese does not let the audience off so easily. We certainly are unable to trust Travis anymore than we can buy into his insights. The film ends with a scene that may or may not have happened, but one thing is for certain — Travis has not changed. The jarring final editing and perspectives of the closing scene leaves the audience startled.

"Listen, you fuckers, you screwheads. Here is a man who would not take it anymore. A man who stood up against the scum, the cunts, the dogs, the filth, the shit. Here is a man who stood up." A chilling voice-over narration that lingers forever... Robert De Niro Taxi Driver Martin Scorsese, 1976 Cinematography | Michael Chapman

“Listen, you fuckers, you screwheads. Here is a man who would not take it anymore. A man who stood up against the scum, the cunts, the dogs, the filth, the shit. Here is a man who stood up.”
A chilling voice-over narration that lingers forever…
Robert De Niro
Taxi Driver
Martin Scorsese, 1976
Cinematography | Michael Chapman

My personal favorite voice-over can be found in Stanley Kubrick’s amazing adaptation of Anthony Burgess’ novel, A Clockwork Orange. Meticulously designed and filmed, this iconic and controversial movie opens with an unforgettable shot. We appear to be entering an unknown world but are greeted by Malcolm Mcdowell’s unmistakable voice. It is his Alex who introduces us to Kubrick’s setting in which we find ourselves:

“There was me, that is Alex, and my three droogs, that is Pete, Georgie and Dim and we sat in the Korova milkbar trying to make up our rassoodocks what to do with the evening. The Korova Milk Bar sold milkplus, milk plus vellocet or synthemesc or drencrom which is what we were drinking. This would sharpen you up and make you ready for a bit of the old ultra-violence. Our pockets were full of money so there was no need on that score, but, as they say, money isn’t everything.”

"Giddy well, little brother. viddy well." A Clockwork Orange Stanley Kubrick, 1971 Cinematography | John Alcott

“Giddy well, little brother. viddy well.”
A Clockwork Orange
Stanley Kubrick, 1971
Cinematography | John Alcott

And with that we are introduced into some future state of what must be England. And judging from Alex‘s Northern Lad Accent, our narrator is somewhere in the limited world of what we have come to know as council estate life. The use of this rebellious teenaged troublemaker as our narrator not only fits the film — it serves to offer us a voice to the illogical and shocking actions of our criminally insane protagonist. This mixed with Kubrick and John Alcotts’ camera perspectives delivers a disturbing evaluation of an attempt to control human cruelty by a brutality that might be even more horrid than our narrator’s psyche. Kubrick asks more questions than he answers and all he really needs is the voice-over of the film’s protagonist to deliver the gut-punches.

Francis Ford Coppola and Michael Herr had an exhausted Martin Sheen read a voice-over for Apocalypse Now as an attempt to provide structure to an epic film that wanted to spiral out of control.  Some will argue that it was valid, I am not among them. This oddly effective mess of a movie is not nearly as interesting as the complexities involved in the making of it.

 "Never get out of the boat." A rather bored and sleepy narration attempts to assign meaning to the meaningless... Martin Sheen Apocalypse Now Francis Ford Coppola, 1979 Cinematography | Vittorio Storaro

“Never get out of the boat.” A rather bored and sleepy narration attempts to assign meaning to the meaningless…
Martin Sheen
Apocalypse Now
Francis Ford Coppola, 1979
Cinematography | Vittorio Storaro

It has always seemed to me that Apocalypse Now would have been better served in under two hours. Marlon Brando’s rambling mixing with the horrifying ritual of animal slaughter would have helped to deliver a more satisfying film than the one (or ones) we have received. Despite itself, this is a film that cannot be dismissed.

Much like the use of sentimental orchestrated strings cue the audience that it is time to allow tears to well up or gather goosebumps as we watch the boy get the girl or the girl lose the boy — voice-over narration is usually an exercise in manipulation that most films really do not need. One of the most shameless uses of voice-over narration would have to be Robert Zemeckis’ Forrest Gump. When this movie first came out I remember thinking that there was something wrong with me. So many people seemed to love a seemingly retarded Tom Hanks intermingling with iconic events with the offer of vomit inducing non-witicisms as narration just left me annoyed. As it soon turned out — I was not alone.

"Life was like a box of chocolates. You never know what you're gonna get." Tom Hanks Forrest Gump Robert Zemeckis, 1994 Cinematography | Don Burgess

“Life was like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.”
Tom Hanks
Forrest Gump
Robert Zemeckis, 1994
Cinematography | Don Burgess

Even when an argument can be made in favor of the poorest voice-over narrations, a counter-argument nearly always defeats it. To roll back to the beginning of this post, when Barbra Streisand decided to star and film The Prince of Tides a viewer pretty much knew what to expect. However what she delivered was a bit more and also a bit less than anticipated. Streisand was able to secure Conroy to adapt his own novel with the assistance of Becky Johnston, but a film belongs to its director. The most problematic aspect of Conroy’s novel is the romantic situation that develops between the protagonist and his sister’s shrink. This challenge found in Conroy’s novel could have easily been pushed aside for what is really at the core of the novel’s beauty. Instead Streisand pushes adultery and reckless ethics to center stage without ever noting either issue of the soft-focused love affair. What is interesting is that this is not the film’s main issue.

"I don't know when my parents began their war against each other - but I do know the only prisoners they took were their children." Despite the cheesy narration Kate Nelligan delivers an amazing turn. The Prince of Tides Barbra Streisand, 1991 Cinematography | Stephen Goldblatt

“I don’t know when my parents began their war against each other – but I do know the only prisoners they took were their children.”
Despite the cheesy narration Kate Nelligan delivers an amazing turn.
The Prince of Tides
Barbra Streisand, 1991
Cinematography | Stephen Goldblatt

It is Streisand’s use of Nick Nolte’s voice-over narration that most harms The Prince of Tides. This is important to note. While we all might roll our eyes at the director’s need to center herself as both the protagonist’s object of Savior and Sexual Goddess, it is harder to blame her for wanting to lose the beauty of Pat Conroy’s writing. However it is crucial for a filmmaker to remember that The Book and The Movie it inspires are two very different animals. Pat Conroy’s writing often approached poetry, but to have even the most gifted actor read it as a narrative device will usually reduce it to mush. As we see three young children holding their breath under the water and race to the top to reveal the film’s title card is cinematic. But to have that scene accompanied by Nick Nolte narrating:

“We found a silent soothing world where there was no pain. A world without mothers or fathers. We would make a circle bound by flesh and blood and water and only when we felt our lungs betray us would we rise towards the light.”  It should work and for some it might, but for most of us these poetic remarks are borderline cringe-inducing. Cinema is already a language in and of itself. Narration like this is heavy-handed at best.

"It seems every day ends with a miracle here." Kevin Costner chose to provide the narrative voice-over for his 1990 epic. Dances With Wolves Kevin Costner, 1990 Cinematography | Dean Semler

“It seems every day ends with a miracle here.”
Kevin Costner chose to provide the narrative voice-over for his 1990 epic.
Dances With Wolves
Kevin Costner, 1990
Cinematography | Dean Semler

If you notice a stronger opinion against Streisand’s The Prince of Tides than Kevin Costner’s Dances With Wolves, the only reason is sexism. Like Streisand’s film that would come a year later, Kevin Costner’s directorial effort was equally invested with genuine importance. Michael Blake’s book inspired Costner to make a film that offers insight into the atrocities against Native Americans. The core message does survive within the once acclaimed film, but mostly this is a vanity project in which the director casts himself in the role of object.

Consistently back lit and in soft-focus, we even get to see Mr. Costner run about nude. And even with Mr. Blake writing the screenplay, Costner leans heavy into his character’s love for an oddly 1980’s coiffed Mary McDonnell. Even the dirt on her face seems to have been placed there by Max Factor. The two white characters become pretty much take center stage bathed in light and breezy soft-focus. However barely anyone noted this at the time. Unlike Streisand, he is a man and has the auto-right to showcase himself exactly the way he chooses. But it is when Costner recites the narration that the film really rides off the rails. While the film wants to shed light on the indignities suffered by Native Americans and demonstrate the beauty that the white men destroyed, it is up to the whitest man on the planet to save the day and take center screen.

“Nothing I have been told about these people is correct. They are not thieves or beggars. They are not the bogeymen they are made out to be. On the contrary, they are polite guests and I enjoy their humor.”

Part of the problem with the narration of Dances With Wolves is its earnest self-importance, but the underlying issue is the fact that Costner sounds like a weed-lovin’ surfer about to take a nap every time he speaks. Of course it does match his flawless hair and ill-suited swagger for the era in which the story takes place.

Luckily Bob Fosse didn’t lose his focus while shooting Cabaret or we might have a film musical featuring Michael York reading from Christopher Isherwood’s The Berlin Stories! And, yes, that would have been awful.

"A paranoid schizophrenic walks into a bar..." A brilliant actor goes for broke but a voice-over narration just about wrecks the whole thing. Tom Hardy & Tom Hardy Legend Brian Helgeland, 2015 Cinematography | Dick Pope

“A paranoid schizophrenic walks into a bar…”
A brilliant actor goes for broke but a voice-over narration just about wrecks the whole thing.
Tom Hardy & Tom Hardy
Legend
Brian Helgeland, 2015
Cinematography | Dick Pope

Last year it was rumored that Brian Helgeland had finally directed a film that would match if not exceed his artistry as the writer of 1997’s LA Confidential. Having penned the script himself from John Pearson’s book about the strange and horrific story of England’s infamous Kray Brothers with Tom Hardy cast to play both brothers — the rumor seemed like it might just be a safe bet. However my gamble of seeing Legend failed to fully reward the promise of the bet.

Uh, oh. Double trouble! Better give 'em some voice-over narration! Tom Hardy + Tom Hardy Brian Helgeland, 2015 Cinematography | Dick Pope

Uh, oh. Double trouble! Better give ’em some voice-over narration!
Tom Hardy + Tom Hardy
Brian Helgeland, 2015
Cinematography | Dick Pope

It is my opinion that Tom Hardy is one of if not the most important movie actor of his generation. The guy has it all. Blessed with talent, skill, on-screen presence, charisma and rugged incredible good looks — Tom Hardy is poised to become a screen legend himself.

As both Reggie and Ronald Kray he is clearly having fun. Equally invested in both characters, Hardy plunges into the two very different but complicated psyches. Walking a sort of tightrope, Hardy manages to be touching, scary and always without fail funny as hell. Shot crisply but relying a bit too much on the limited budget to create the actor on both sides of the screen, the special effects are not always on spot.

Even though the budget has severely restricted the digital effects -- These 3 are poised to creep you out and make you laugh... Tom Hardy, Christopher Eccleston & Tom Hardy Legend Brian Helgeland, 2015 Cinematography | Dick Pope

Even though the budget has severely restricted the digital effects — These 3 are poised to creep you out and make you laugh…
Tom Hardy, Christopher Eccleston & Tom Hardy
Legend
Brian Helgeland, 2015
Cinematography | Dick Pope

Christopher Eccleston approaches his role as the copper out to stop the two brothers as if he was speeding on cocaine. Mr. Eccleston is in over-drive and manages to make a predictable cliche of a character memorable. But this is Tom Hardy’s show and it would seem to be aiming for intentional darkly twisted comedy.

Or were my laughs intended by Mr. Helgeland? Sadly if they were, he must have had a change-of-heart in post-production.

Emily Browning is not the greatest actor working, but she is certainly a capable performer. It is poor Ms. Browning who has been assigned the task of providing Legend ‘s voice-over narration.

And, this narration is bad. Painfully bad. And to make it all the worse she has been cast as the fiancée who committed suicide prior to marrying Reggie Kray. Yes, this is a voice-over narration from the grave minus any snarky sense of humor. Helgeland appears to have pushed Browning for a deadly serious reading.

And it just about strangles his film of any life. To make it all the worse, Frances Shea ‘s commentary from the dead fails to actually connect with her living character. Frances certainly displays issues regarding her intended’s way of making a living but she seems game enough to look the other way. If anything, Frances seems a bit dim-witted or simplistic in her thinking and displays none of her dead self’s anger and intelligence.

"I'm a giver. Not a receiver. I am not a faggot!" Legend Brian Helgeland, 2015 Cinematography | Dick Pope

“I’m a giver. Not a receiver. I am not a faggot!”
Tom Hardy as The Kray Brothers Legend
Brian Helgeland, 2015
Cinematography | Dick Pope

But what is truly baffling about Helgeland’s use of voice-over narration is that the film needs none at all.

If a sound editor were to wipe away Browning’s narration — the film would still flow. In fact, it would flow better.

If only a few of Ms. Browning’s scenes were cut, the film would have succeeded as a demented comic take at something that really happened under the noses of England’s leadership and celebrity brass.

Legend most likely could never be a perfect film, but it could have been perfectly entertaining. As it is now, Legend nearly crumbles under the weight of a dead girl’s lofty narration.

Intentional or not, this film is often criminally comic. Tom Hardy x 2 Brian Helgeland, 2015 Cinematography | Dick Pope

Intentional or not, this film is often criminally comic.
Tom Hardy x 2
Brian Helgeland, 2015
Cinematography | Dick Pope

Sometimes the less said, the better.

Matty Stanfield, 3.8.16

 

 

 

 

 

As there are less than three months of the year left, I find myself thinking of the films that had the biggest impact on me. In other words, my favorite films of the year. My list is not finalized and could easily change as we move into January. There are more than a few films I’ve not yet seen that will be coming out within the next three months are so. This views are my own and should not be attached to any other person or entity but me. 

Uh, oh. This might present more fright than you expect... Mark Duplass CREEP Patrick Brice, 2015

Uh, oh. This might present more fright than you expect…
Mark Duplass
CREEP
Patrick Brice, 2015

There are a few things that come to my mind as I look over my list of favorite films:

  1. I’ve never noted so many “horror” films to make my list.
  2. The salary gap between female and male actors has never been so bad, but there have been a number of truly exceptional work by female actors. And contrary to the general tone of what I’ve been reading/hearing, there are a number of amazing performances by women.
  3. The voice of women is most notably strong in my current list. This is wicked cool! 
  4. This will read as “crass” but I do not give a shit about Oscars, BAFTAs and the slew of other awards. These are political in nature and most usually always suspect in terms of artistic evaluation.

    According to The Oscars, this is THE BEST Film Director of 2012. I content this as one of many reasons to disregard The Oscars.

    According to The Oscars, this is THE BEST Film Director of 2012. I content this as one of many reasons to disregard The Oscars.

  5. In my view, there is no such thing as a “best” when it comes to collaborative art. Actually, art in general is subjective. What resonates for me might not register for the person next to me. It is rare that I see one movie or one performance that I feel deserves title of “best.” And usually, when I grow to feel that someone did present “the best” it is a number of years after the fact.
  6. These are just my personal favorite films thus far. No reason to get upset with me. 
  7. You might not agree, but if you are like me — when I read the list of another individual’s favorites it often gives me pause to revisit my opinions regarding certain films. It also sends me out to view films I might have somehow missed.
  8. George Miller’s Mad Max: Fury Road is not among my favorite films. Stop! Don’t be flaming me! I didn’t say I hated
    Cinematic Masterpiece, Relentless Visual & Audio Assault, Creative but not among my favorite films of the year. Mad Max: Fury Road George Miller, 2015

    Cinematic Masterpiece, Relentless Visual & Audio Assault, Creative but not among my favorite films of the year.
    Mad Max: Fury Road
    George Miller, 2015

    it! Leave me alone. Granted it was an impressive visual and audio assault, but I didn’t see it go anywhere particularly “new.” For me this exorcise in unrelenting violence was of merit, but I didn’t think it particularly “great.” Far from being “bad” but equally far from being “great.” The movie was essentially a smartly executed 90’s metal demolition derby race from one point to another. …Twice. I honestly expected more. Just my opinion.

  9. F. Gary Gray’s Straight Outta Compton had more of an impact for me, but had too many flaws for me to consider it a “great” movie. I thought it was good. But I really wanted to love this movie. I thought it was interesting in the way it opted to depict the women in the N.W.A. history without comment. Also interesting to me was what often felt like a celebration of, in my 1990’s ingrained brain, sees as a sort of corporate appropriation or selling out. In many ways this film is as much about business than Hip-Hop culture or art form. And an interesting culture and art form in which women are relegated to important roles as “holes” of one sort or another rather than fully fleshed out female characters.  I am not sure “interesting” is a good thing, but I’m certain it is not altogether “bad.” Straight Outta Compton has as much to not say as it does. This is an entertaining, important and good film.But it did not make my list.
  10. The Safdie Brothers film, Heaven Knows What, refuses to leave my mind.
    There can be no denial of this film's import and power. However, this film verges toward a an uncomfortable line... Heaven Knows What Benny Safdie & Josh Safdie, 2015

    There can be no denial of this film’s import and power. However, this film verges toward a an uncomfortable line…
    Heaven Knows What
    Benny Safdie & Josh Safdie, 2015

    This effective and disturbingly passive view of young homeless junkies kicked me in the gut. I’m still unsure how I feel about this dark film. It is an ethical issue for me. But I’d be a hypocrite if I didn’t include it on my my list. Arielle Holmes’s story and The Safdie Bros. filming of it is unforgettable to me. But I squirm as I list it. The intention of this film is worrying to me, but the artistic value and what it ultimately presents are far too powerful for me to dismiss. Also, I’m very tender-hearted when it comes to issues relating to mental illness and drug addiction. My feeling about this film may say more about me than the art of the film.

  11. I have seen legal and invited screenings of rough cuts for Rick Alverson’s Entertaiment, Danny Boyle’s Steve Jobs, Justin Kurzel’s Macbeth and Todd Haynes’ Carol. As far as I know only Carol has not been re-edited. Boyle’s film has apparently been completely re-cut and faces more tweaking as it’s official release edges forward. No amount of editing will be able to steal the power that Fassbender brings to the film. He is reason enough to see this film. Trust me.
    Tiny rainbow circulates as more editing goes on... Michael Fassbender IS Steve Jobs Danny Boyle, 2015

    Tiny rainbow circulates as more editing goes on…
    Michael Fassbender IS
    Steve Jobs
    Danny Boyle, 2015

    Maybe the new edit will ease some of the worrying issues with Kate Winslet’s accent — or perhaps explain it if it was intentional. It is my understanding that Macbeth has been shortened (and hopefully some of the far too mumbled/quiet dialogue has been somehow enhanced.) There was a constant struggle to understand what Fassbender and Cotillard were saying.

    Wait. What did Lady Macbeth just say? What accent is that? What did Macbeth say? Speak up! But it and they look pretty! Marion Cotillard Macbeth Justin Kurzel, 2015 Cinematography | Adam Arkapaw

    Wait. What did Lady Macbeth just say? What accent is that? What did Macbeth say? Speak up! But it and they look pretty!
    Marion Cotillard
    Macbeth
    Justin Kurzel, 2015
    Cinematography | Adam Arkapaw

    I LOVED Alverson’s film, Entertainment, but as it is still in “post-production” I’m not sure it will be the same version that I saw. As for Carol, I thought it was a great art piece. Cate Blanchett was almost flawless in her performance, but the whole of the film felt like a Sirkian-drenched non-ironic soap opera. The movie is beautifully shot but trapped within a box of it’s own design. It feels pretty but false. It was a sort of lifeless film to me. I’ve a feeling I’m going to be alone in my opinion. I do plan on seeing it again when it is officially released.

So Here Are My Favorite Films of 2015 Thus Far In No Particular Order:

  1. The Wolf Pack | Crystal Moselle’s documentary is as much an ode to human survival as it is to the magical power of movies.

    Learning and understanding the world from movies... The Wolfpack Crystal Moselle, 2015

    Learning and understanding the world from movies…
    The Wolfpack
    Crystal Moselle, 2015

  2. Love & Mercy | Bill Pohlad’s bio film about Brian Wilson is as realistic as it is surreal in the exploration of a deeply troubled but incredible visionary mind. Deconstructed scene-by-scene, Pohlad’s film is an amazing study of Art and Artist.

    A masterful and surprising film that seemed to come from nowhere completely by surprise. Pure Cinematic Magic. Bill Pohlad, 2015

    A masterful and surprising film that seemed to come from nowhere completely by surprise. Pure Cinematic Magic.
    Bill Pohlad, 2015

  3. Turbo Kid | I didn’t expect to even like this movie, but I feel head over heels in love with it quicker than the opening credits could finish. Filled with early 80’s synth music and a gleeful gore-filled energy. This is a smart film. 
    Welcome back to artistic movie posters. Grab your BMX and be a hero! TURBO KID François Simard, Anouk & Yoann-Karl Whissell, 2015

    Welcome back to artistic movie posters. Grab your BMX and be a hero!
    TURBO KID
    François Simard, Anouk & Yoann-Karl Whissell, 2015

    Anouk Yoann-Karl Whissell and François Simard have created a mini-masterpiece of retro Sci-Fi BMX magic.

  4. Queen of Earth | Alex Ross Perry’s experimental and often surrealistic study of an emotional break has stirred up so many heartfelt opinions it’s hardly worth debating it’s impact.
    You are the reason there is no escape from indecency and gossip. And, lies." Queen of Earth Alex Ross Perry, 2015

    You are the reason there is no escape from indecency and gossip. And, lies.”
    Queen of Earth
    Alex Ross Perry, 2015

    Any work that causes so many conflicted, passionate and opposing reactions is obviously touching a nerve. I love absolutely every aspect of this movie.

  5. Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter |  David & Nathan Zellners’ latest film is their best and interestingly most experimental.
    "Solitude? It's just fancy loneliness." Rinko Kikuchi Kumiko The Treasure Hunter The Zellner Bros, 2015

    “Solitude? It’s just fancy loneliness.”
    Rinko Kikuchi
    Kumiko The Treasure Hunter
    The Zellner Bros, 2015

    Taking the concept of “meta film” to a whole new level. This is a fascinating, unique, original film that plays with truth and horror in much the same way that The Coen Bros. did in 1996 with the film that inspired the events that inspired the movie that inspires. Amazing film from all perspective.

  6. It Follows | David Robert Mitchell’s slick horror film plays out like a horrible nightmare.
    "You don't believe me do you?" IT FOLLOWS David Robert Mitchell, 2015

    “You don’t believe me do you?”
    IT FOLLOWS
    David Robert Mitchell, 2015

    The movie flows the audience into a dark, scary and often opposingly beautiful dream. As disturbing as the film is, I always hate to see it end. Like Ana Lily Amirpour’s horror film, Mitchell’s elevates beyond the horror genre in which it resides. It is all the more amazing when you realize how low the budget for this film was. Also worth noting is the way in which David Robert Mitchell plays around with eras. It is impossible to know when this dark tale is taking place — and this is intentional.  Since this film’s release, there has been a critical backlash that I find problematic. This is an extraordinary bit of filmmaking. Ana Lily Amirpour’s A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night almost made my list. I quite liked it.

  7. Creep | Patrick Brice’s film took me by complete surprise — in a very good way.
    "I got a little surprise for you in there. See ya soon, Buddy!" Creep Patrick Brice, 2015

    “I got a little surprise for you in there. See ya soon, Buddy!”
    Creep
    Patrick Brice, 2015

    The movie is truly horrifying. You might find yourself laughing, but later as you rethink what Brice and Mark Duplass co-wrote, the strange realism that exists here is unsettling.

  8. FELT | Jason Banker’s film is clearly based on the artwork and traumatic experience of Bay Area artist, Amy Everson. This sleek, twisted and disturbing examination of rape culture from the perspective of a recovering female victim is a polarizing movie. Some hate it, some love it, some consider it flawed beyond redemption and others are simply confused by what Banker presents. I loved it.
    "My life is a fucking nightmare." FELT Jason Banker, 2015

    “My life is a fucking nightmare.”
    FELT
    Jason Banker, 2015

    True, Amy Everson is not a professional actor and there are limitations as a result. However, she comes through when it matters. And this is a topic that should matter to all of us. It is certainly a risky proposition to make a “horror” film out of a tragedy that so many women face. This movie is nothing if not bold. In my view, the film “discusses” Rape Culture in an acutely articulate manner. The film manages to creatively remind us that we are all playing into this culture whether we realize it or not. The main character of FELT is clearly wrong, but much of what she attempts to communicate is valid. Kentucker Audley is highly effective here as a sort of wolf in sheep’s clothing. I stand by this movie.

  9. Ex-Machina | Alex Garland is not re-inventing any wheels, but he polishes them brilliantly. This is a creative, innovative and brilliantly executed Sci-Fi horror film featuring two great turns by Oscar Isaac and Domhnall Gleeson.
  10. Reality | Quentin Dupieux’s latest film remains tied to Surrealism and Absurdism.
    The ever-growing farce of culture... Reality Quentin Dupieux, 2015

    The ever-growing farce of culture…
    Reality
    Quentin Dupieux, 2015

    Here he is exploring the barren wasteland that is quickly taking the place of culture.

  11. The Falling |  Carol Morley’s British film is less horror than a sort of lush cinematic poetry fully supported by Maisie Williams who gives an amazing performance. This is Peter Weir territory made with a stronger Feminist viewpoint. A filmmaker to watch. This film seems to have slipped beneath the radar for many. It is more than worth a look.
  12. 6 Years | Hannah Fidell’s masterful film has been tragically missed by a majority of film critics and audiences. I suspect this has something to do with the promotion of the film. This is tragic because the promotion was actually rather brilliant in a unique way.
    "Look me in the eye and tell me." 6 Years Hannah Fidell, 2015

    “Look me in the eye and tell me.”
    6 Years
    Hannah Fidell, 2015

    Fidell drenches her film in a sort of idealistic dewy haze intended to capture that amazing powerful feeling of true first love. I suspect that many expected this film to actually be a lush and romantic “chick flick.” This movie is as far from that universe as a film can get. The question Fidell’s film poses is not “Will they be able to make it work?” The question here is “Should they even try to make it work?” As in “real life” – the answer is not simplistic or easy to face. 6 Years explores a relationship from a perspective that few filmmakers have been willing to take. This film isn’t aiming to provoke. It aims to be honest. Taissa Farmiga and Ben Rosenfield both provide brutally realistic performances. The all too serious topic of domestic abuse has never been captured in this way. It is potent and heart breaking. 6 Years is a Must See film. Do not miss it. 

*** SABBATICAL | Brandon Colvin’s masterful film is actually from 2013, but it has yet to secure a distribution deal. It is however available for rental/purchase here:

http://sabbatical-mossgarden.com

Robert Longstreet and Rhoda Griffis stand out among several potent performances.

A challenging film virtually flawless in execution remains without a distributor. Sabbatical Brandon Colvin, 2013 Poster Design | Jenni Dickens

A challenging film virtually flawless in execution remains without a distributor.
Sabbatical
Brandon Colvin, 2013
Poster Design | Jenni Dickens

Aaron Granat’s cinematography and Tony Oswald’s editing like all of the actors involved merge perfectly into Colvin’s Formalist approach which reminds of Robert Bresson, remains firmly unique unto itself. Brilliant and rewarding. I continue to “pimp” this film out to everyone I know in the World of Film Art. I have no choice but to mention it again here.

As for the performances that most resonated for me:

Paul Dano as Young Brian Wilson is incredible.

Paul Dano is the Young Brian Wilson Love & Mercy Bill Pohlad, 2015 Cinematography | Robert D. Yeoman

Paul Dano is the Young Brian Wilson
Love & Mercy
Bill Pohlad, 2015
Cinematography | Robert D. Yeoman

Michael Fassbender’s doesn’t so much play Steve Jobs as he literally seems to become him. Jason Segel almost does the same in his performance as David Foster Wallace in End of the Tour. Ben Rosenberg is brilliant as the torn young man who must make a tough choice in 6 Years.

Everything else aside, the line between "acting" and "reality" feels blurred by the strength of Michael Fassbender. Steve Jobs Danny Boyle, 2015 Cinematography | Alwin H. Küchler

Everything else aside, the line between “acting” and “reality” feels blurred by the strength of Michael Fassbender.
Steve Jobs
Danny Boyle, 2015
Cinematography | Alwin H. Küchler

James Hebert probably made the most startling film performance in Two Step.

Nothing can quite prepare you for where James Hebert takes his role... Two-Step Alex R. Johnson, 2015

Nothing can quite prepare you for where James Hebert takes his role…
Two-Step
Alex R. Johnson, 2015

And, I’m sorry, but Mark Duplass scared the shit out of me in Creep. In addition, Josh Lucas blew me away in John Magary’s odd experimental character study of two brothers. If you’ve not seen The Mend, you should add it to your list to see.

Josh Lucas, e-cigs, hair balls and rage.  The Mend John Magary, 2015

Josh Lucas, e-cigs, hair balls and rage.
The Mend
John Magary, 2015

Lily Tomlin was so good in Grandma, I didn’t want the movie to end. Chiara D’Anna and Sidse Babett Knudsen deliver clever and complex performances in Peter Stickland’s The Duke of Burgundy that are as intelligent as the are erotic and disturbing.

Searing into your brain. Sheila Vand as your vampire next door. A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night Ana Lily Amirpour, 2015 Cinematography | Lyle Vincent

Searing into your brain.
Sheila Vand as your vampire next door.
A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night
Ana Lily Amirpour, 2015
Cinematography | Lyle Vincent

Sheila Vand is absolutely unforgettable as that girl walking home alone at night. Maika Monroe blew me away as “Jay” in It Follows. She goes well beyond the expectation of the genre. Maisie Williams was equally powerful in her turn in The Falling. Taissa Farmiga proved to be more than up to the challenge of portraying the darker side of insecurity in Hannah Fidell’s 6 Years.

Taissa Farmiga loves Ben Rosenfield into a tight corner. 6 Years Hannah Fidell, 2015 Cinematography | Andrew Droz Palermo

Taissa Farmiga loves Ben Rosenfield into a tight corner.
6 Years
Hannah Fidell, 2015
Cinematography | Andrew Droz Palermo

Cobie Smulders’ work grabbed me twice this year: Andrew Bujalski’s charming Results and Kris Swanberg’s quietly potent, Unexpected. Rinko Kikuchi’s work in The Zellner Brothers’ Kumiko The Treasure Hunter is miraculous performance. Greta Gerwig delivered her charismatic best in Mistress America.

Lily Tomlin owns the show and the road. Grandma Paul Weitz, 2015

Lily Tomlin owns the show and the road.
Grandma
Paul Weitz, 2015

And, of course, there is Cate Blanchett. She is great as Carol, but Todd Haynes really poses some unexpected challenges for his leading ladies — this is acting in a sort of vacuum. While there are still several key films I’ve yet to see, this is one of those years when one actress stands out in my mind as “the best” — I would be shocked if any artist male or female delivers a more strange, perverse, disturbing and unforgettable turn than Elisabeth Moss in Queen of Earth.

Elisabeth Moss Queen of Earth Alex Ross Perry | 2015 Cinematography | Sean Price Williams

Elisabeth Moss
Queen of Earth
Alex Ross Perry | 2015
Cinematography | Sean Price Williams

Even if one dislikes the film, it would be difficult to dismiss this performance.And Katherine Waterston’s performances in both Queen Of Earth and Steve Jobs are quite worthy. Curiously, I’m still confused about Marion Cotillard’s performance in the rough cut I’ve seen of Macbeth. But as that film has been re-edited I need to wait to actually form a solid opinion.  Any way I look at it, 2015 belonged to female actors. This has not been so true in a while.

Well, this is my list for now. To be honest, I’m not all that excited about the final months of 2015 film releases.

The Lobster Yorgos Lanthimos | 2015

The Lobster
Yorgos Lanthimos | 2015

There are a few films I’m quite eager to see: Ben Wheatley’s High Rise offers a great deal of interest for me. Can’t wait. Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Lobster is also a movie of interest, even if it looks a bit too obvious and comedic than what I had anticipated. And Sarah Gavron’s Suffragette might offer more than I’m expecting. She has gathered a mighty force of acting talent!  It is one I want to see.

Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Philippe Petit The Walk Robert Zemeckis, 2015 Cinematography | Dariusz Wolski

Joseph Gordon-Levitt as Philippe Petit
The Walk
Robert Zemeckis, 2015
Cinematography | Dariusz Wolski

I’m also curious to see Joseph Gordon-Levitt, a very under-rated actor, in both Snowden and The Walk. However, I’ve a great deal of worry regarding the quality of these two films. The mix of Oliver Stone with the topic and issues related to Edward Snowden looks good on paper, but cocaine and paranoia seem to have eroded Stone’s work since 1994. And I don’t think I’ve enjoyed a Robert Zemeckis film since 1992. …And, even then, Death Becomes Her was not altogether good.  I’ve also been waiting all year to see Alison Bagnall’s Funny Bunny.

Funny Bunny Alison Bagnall, 2015 Cinematography | Ashley Connor

Funny Bunny
Alison Bagnall, 2015
Cinematography | Ashley Connor

Of all these films, this is the one I’m most excited to see.

Of course I am writing about Film Art. It is often unpredictable and surprising. As it turns out, Jean-Luc Godard was not correct. Cinema is not dead. Of course we knew that as his brilliantly perverse and wrong film, Weekend, was not at all a signal of death. It was actually an alarming reminder of the power of cinema.

the death of cinema? The Weekend Jean-Luc Godard | 1967

the death of cinema?
The Weekend
Jean-Luc Godard | 1967

Matty Stanfield, 9.8.15